:emacs: 馃摎 

Learning Gnu . Despite being old enough to drive in the States it's pretty good with fundamentals--I didn't realize there were operations you could run from the buffer list window, for instance! I also realized that this must be what inspired Mu4e's email processing system.

For Org Mode I've downloaded the manual and have it loaded on KOReader, and for more recent general Emacs stuff I'm considering a Mastering Emacs, though it does have a pretty hefty price tag.

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:emacs: 馃摎馃敄 

Just read about & tried out bookmarks on Emacs and omg :blobcataww: finally a way to bypass that annoying directory structure for often-used but not always-open files! Clearly I need to get IDO-mode working with it, though, to get something like fuzzy search.

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:emacs: 馃摎 馃搧 

Read about and trying out Dired and this isn't bad, honestly! I prefer it to the terminal menu and may not need a dedicated file manager anymore--which is just as well, since I've been avoiding Thunar after it crashed X a couple times.

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:emacs: 馃摎 馃搧 馃 

Okay so some of the Dired commands are outdated, which is fine, it's been like 16 years after all. I can look them up online, no problem, now that I know the broad outlines. Also a surprising number of commands still hold up, for better or for worse.

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:emacs: 馃摎 馃搯 馃槻 

Learning Gnu Emacs: Here's a diary function to keep track of your dates!
Me: Lol there's no way this is still maintained when Org Mode is shipped with Emacs
Me, after trying it: :pika_surprise:

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:emacs: 馃摎 馃搯 馃 

I mean it's very limited--you just keep adding entries on a daily, block, cyclical etc. basis, one per line--and the diary file would get really cluttered after intensive use, but there's also a certain appealing simplicity in simply adding things on without worrying about the complicated functions of Org Mode. If you don't require anything more than a reminder on a certain day it could be useful. Anyway it was a bit of a shock to realize this actually still works!

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:emacs: 馃摎 outline mode lol 

I skimmed the sections on Outline Mode for historical interest because I know Org Mode was based on it, and it has been, shall we say, an unadulterated improvement. Outline Mode had asterisks to mark heading levels with some dynamic key-based controls, and that's about where the similarities end. Some highlights:

- C-c C-a to show all and C-c C-q to hide sublevels and also C-c C-d to hide subheads and body under current heading, got that? Also C-c C-c to hide body AND C-c C-l to hide body + the bodies of subheadings and C-c C-e to show body but not the bodies of subheads and...
- Oh, and C-c C-^ to promote heading and C-c C-v to demote heading
- As far as I can tell there was no way at this point to move the headings up and down, I guess that came later
- "Of course, after the document is complete, you'll want to remove the asterisks. You can use a query-replace to change the asterisk-style headers into headers that are appropriate for your preferred formatting style." :blobcat0_0:

I mean kudos to the work of the devs (including of course those who developed Outline Mode) but this is like a *parody* of Emacs functions omg

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:emacs: 馃摎 , next! 

I think I've gotten more or less what I can out of Learning Gnu Emacs, though I might return to the Elisp chapter if and when I want to write my own functions. It may be old but was good for learning the fundamentals, most of which is current. Unfairly, it may be the discussions of outmoded functionalities like outline mode, diary, and (strangest of all) enriched mode that stay with me the most, though 馃ぃ

I've now moved on to Mastering Emacs, which I'm even more excited about because it's far more modern and I've already learned a lot from the author's blog. The target audience of "technically inclined but not necessarily a programmer" describes me exactly, so I'm looking forward to learning a lot!

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:emacs: 馃摎 when did that happen 

I'm already on Page 128 of Mastering ? I was reading little by little and didn't even skip any pages!

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:emacs: 馃摎 buffers 

I mean I guess it's doable if it's not a drain on the system (and I don't think it should be?) and you have IDO or similar enabled to find what you need quickly, especially since finding files starting from the root director is kind of a pain and recent files isn't enabled by default. Keeping buffers open seems like a kind of quick-and-dirty recent files function, seen that way. Since I read this I've stopped going out of my way to kill buffers, though I doubt I'll get to hundreds or thousands since I regularly close the X server down.

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:emacs: 馃摎 halfway, autocomplete modes 

I am more than halfway through Mastering Emacs and am a little sad about that lol. I just skimmed through the movement sections since I've seen the content a couple of times before and I use Evil Mode anyway. There's a lot of depth to it but it seems mostly useful to devs.

And there was also an explanation of Helm, finally 馃槀 I mean I could have looked it up any time, but just couldn't be bothered. Much like Ivy which I briefly tried because of that System Crafters guy on YouTube, it seems like overkill for me and Ido is plenty enough for now. Maybe I'll check out what's the deal with Fido sometime, though it's not mentioned in he book I think.

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:emacs: 馃摎 almost done, skips & thoughts 

I have less than a hundred pages to go on Mastering Emacs. Again I skimmed through a lot of stuff that seemed mostly of interest to devs, like the ins and outs of search-and-replace, and am now at the last chapter about practicals--tips for exploring Emacs and discovering it on my own. It was interesting to see Version Control as the example for learning, though. VC was something I had skipped over altogether in Learning GNU Emacs because I assumed it had been superseded by Git. Apparently it's still in use, especially when dealing with multiple version control software backends! Still doubt I'll use VC myself, but it was interesting.

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:emacs: 馃摎 done 

I finished reading Mastering Emacs yesterday, and I liked it! It took me over the basics with information much more recent than Learning GNU Emacs, and I picked up some nifty stuff I wouldn't have thought to look for. I like the author's emphasis on looking around Emacs's built-in documentation, something that had served me well when I hit an extremely niche bug early on in my Emacs usage that I don't think anyone even knew about (I contacted the development team about it, let's hope it gets fixed 馃し鈥嶁檧锔 ). The book was good as both a learning resource and as a reference, and I expect to get more out of looking over my bookmarks and highlights over time.

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:emacs: 馃摎 Org Mode manual 

And now I've started once again looking over the Org Mode manual--not reading this through like the other books but looking at the parts that look interesting. This is the best-written technical manual I have ever seen, so well-organized, clearly explained, and full of useful information.

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:emacs: 馃摎 Intro to Elisp 

Also started on An Introduction to Programming in Emacs Lisp, I'm not a programmer so I figure I'll get more out of the Elisp reference manual once I understand the basics.

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:emacs: 馃摎 just wondering 

Siri is it normal to read four books about your text editor

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:emacs: 馃摎 shortcut for org-mode checkbox 

I did not know you could add a checkbox with C-u C-c C-c instead of manually typing [ ]! There does need to be a preceding -, though. C-u C-c C-x C-b achieves the same thing but is a whole lot more complicated so...

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:emacs: 馃摎 ending repeating tasks 

It's been a recurring (heh) complaint that repeating tasks in can't be set with end dates and won't die as a result, but reading through the manual today (as one does) I found out that marking a task with C-- 1 C-c C-t (marking a task done with numeric prefix argument of -1) can mark a repeating task as DONE. orgmode.org/manual/Repeated-ta From my testing this seems to work--it's not as precise as setting an end date but it still prevented the task from showing up in Agenda after the date it was marked done in this way.

A somewhat cleaner alternative, especially for close-ended tasks, is to use C-c C-x c (org-clone-subtree-with-time-shift) to clone a time-stamped task a set number of times with designated date shifts. orgmode.org/manual/Structure-E

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re: :emacs: 馃摎馃敄 

@ljwrites oh huh! ive never messed with bookmarks before!

theres an addon that i use.... i can*not* remember the name of right now

but it keeps buffer/file names in the buffer change list (C-x b) even when they arent open and opening them opens the file.

it may tie into the bookmark system? because now that im describing it it sounds very similar

if i can find the name of the addon i'll let you know!

re: :emacs: 馃摎馃敄 

@compufox ooh that sounds really convenient! Yeah it does sound somewhat related, since the bookmark list also keeps things in list whether the file is open or not. Kind of a hybrid bookmark/buffer list, if you will.

re: :emacs: 馃摎馃敄 

@compufox @ljwrites helm-mini does what you mention for me, with that shortcut. it lists recentf files in the change buffer list, allowing you to filter for files open or recent files in the same minibuffer. super quick. / not sure if that鈥檚 what you use tho, there鈥檚 prob lots of other ways to do same.

:emacs: 馃摎 馃搧 馃 

@ljwrites for recent files, maybe recentf combines with ido? (i use it w helm) you bring up a list of recent files and then start typing/guessing the file name to filter the list. it鈥檚 very fast.

:emacs: 馃摎 馃搧 馃 

@mousebot Thanks, I'll give that a try! it certainly sounds better than the default "type the full filepath" (even if it's auto-completed) approach to finding files.

:emacs: 馃摎 when did that happen 

@ljwrites smol pages giant text

:emacs: 馃摎 when did that happen 

@maloki yeah it's possible, it's hard to tell on ePub but I have seen a complaint that the physical book has big margins and large fonts so there isn't much content compared to the page count.

:emacs: 馃摎 thousands?! 

@chaomodus I suspected as much 馃様

:emacs: 馃摎 shortcut for org-mode checkbox 

@ljwrites I actually find the massive overloading of C-c C-c to be one of org's most annoying features because its so much harder to first discover and then remember all the things that one magic keybinding can do. Plus it's very context dependent (so you have to pay close attention to where point is to know what it will do) and controlling its behaviour with prefix args makes it more opaque.

:emacs: 馃摎 shortcut for org-mode checkbox 

@ljwrites I really appreciate M-S-RET to add a new list item with checkbox.

:emacs: 馃摎 thousands?! 

@ljwrites I guess I'm just not serious then....

That's okay, I might not be a serious Emacs user but I'm a happy one.

:emacs: 馃摎 thousands?! 

@JimG "Do you want to be happy or do you want to be a serious Emacs user?"

:emacs: 馃摎 thousands?! 

@ljwrites Happy!

:emacs: 馃摎 thousands?! 

@ljwrites "Do all Emacs users have ADHD?"

:emacs: 馃摎 thousands?! 

@maloki Emacs, where ADHD behavior is totally normal.

:emacs: 馃摎 thousands?! 

@ljwrites

Yeah, we鈥檙e fine. We just like buffers, okay?

(Also, I tend to work on very large programs with hundreds of source files and I just leave the buffers around in case I need them again.)

:emacs: 馃摎 thousands?! 

@ljwrites Just pulling up an org-mode agenda leaves me with a couple dozen buffers. And my job has me editing many, many different repositories. If I didn't shut down my laptop on a regular basis I'd definitely end up with hundreds of buffers.

re: :emacs: 馃摎 thousands?! 

@ljwrites I don't know, but TIL I'm on my way to become a serious i3 user

re: :emacs: 馃摎 thousands?! 

@kiilas you will figure out how to have thousands of workspaces, I believe in you! :blobcataww:

:emacs: 馃摎 when did that happen 

@ljwrites

Oooh I really want to actually learn emacs, Mastering Emacs looks good

:emacs: 馃摎 when did that happen 

@Alonealastalovedalongthe I recommend it! It's useful and fun to read.

:emacs: 馃摎 馃搯 馃槻 

@ljwrites org mode is shipped with emacs!??

:emacs: 馃摎 馃搯 馃槻 

@daffodilian yup Org is part of the core Emacs... code, package, whatever you call it, for modern versions. You only have to open a file with a .org extension to activate it (or do some config stuff to activate it in other files, but I personally never bothered).

:emacs: 馃摎 馃搯 馃槻 

@ljwrites dang i Swear i installed it manually....

:emacs: 馃摎 馃搯 馃槻 

@daffodilian like how, was it an older version? Or maybe one of the org-enhancing packages?

:emacs: 馃摎 馃搯 馃槻 

@ljwrites huh maybe it was just adding the org repository to the package manager, i have `org` in the package list twice and neither are installed lmao

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