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Being privileged and disadvantaged at the same time 

It's really not that hard to understand that you can be disadvantaged and privileged at the same time.

I am disadvantaged by a disabling chronic illness that's taken much of my life away from me. But privileged by my partner and I being in a comfortable financial position, something many disabled people don't have.

I'm disadvantaged by being a woman, but privileged by being a white cis woman. I still experience oppression (sexism, patriarchy), but the oppression isn't as bad as that which a black trans woman will experience (sexism, patriarchy, transphobia and racism).

You don't lose anything by understanding your privilege. With some reflection and honesty, you can gain a better understanding of the intersections of different privileges and disadvantages, and how you can work harder, and be a better ally with others.

Being privileged and disadvantaged at the same time 

@GwenfarsGarden

Extremely well put.

If there was an automated "boost this every n days" feature, we would be pulling the trigger.

👏 👏 👏

Being privileged and disadvantaged at the same time 

@CreatureOfTheHill thank you. I was nervous about expressing this right, so this kind of comment helps dispell that :)

Being privileged and disadvantaged at the same time 

@GwenfarsGarden I came for the florespondence and stay for the wisdom. Very nicely put.

Being privileged and disadvantaged at the same time 

@dch that's so kind. Thank you :)

Being privileged and disadvantaged at the same time 

@GwenfarsGarden
Absolutely! I'm a lot of marginalisations, but still look like an abled white girl. Whether that's good or not is context-specific.

There's also the part where a lot of things make pretty equal pros/cons lists.

I'm trans (nb), still look enough like my assigned gender to keep me safe, and it results in misgendering.

Invisible disabilities tend not to get strangers being awful, instead they get entirely ignored.

Being privileged and disadvantaged at the same time 

@GwenfarsGarden
Point is, everything is complicated, nuance is good, there will be at least one advantage / at least one disadvantage that can be found in anything and acknowledging both those is good.

Being privileged and disadvantaged at the same time 

@certifiedperson Context can make a big difference. I found once I started using a walking stick, people were more careful around me. But conversely, when I use my mobility scooter, people, (including myself at times), see me as being in the way, and/or lazy (coz I don't look sick...). I'm disabled in both contexts yet can get treated so differently. It can be wild at times.

Misgendering must be tough to go through. I changed my name (for different reasons) when I was 18, and being deadnamed was very upsetting. But it's not the same as being misgendered, which brings in dysphoria and other negative feelings, that are beyond my experience.

As you say, it's complicated and nuance is really important. Recognising our privileges doesn't lessen the impacts of our disadvantages.

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Rage.love

Generalist Hometown instance with a strong focus on community standards. No TERF, no SWERF, no Nazi, no Centrist.